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20130106
20130114
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:00pm EST
third lie." in the book professor gelles argues that the vast majority of government social programs don't work and suggests a different approach. this is about ten minutes. gls well, booktv is on the road. we're in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania, and we're interviewing some professors who also happen to be authors. and we want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania's school of social policy and practice. this is richard gelles on your screen. and one of his books, his most recent, is called "the third lie: why government programs don't work and a blue print for change." dr. gelles, i'm here from the government, and i'm here to help you. is that not true? >> guest: not true. >> host: why not? >> guest: because most government social programs which are designed to help people don't actually help. in some instances it is little more than the, i hate saying this, but the do-gooder full employment act. it provides lots of jobs for people who'd like the help, but at the end of the day if you look at whether the needle has been moved and people have real
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 3:00pm EST
a book called "killing unicorns." i get the unicorn. they don't. by the way, how many people are fans or "red eye." [cheers] >> all right. this whole unicorn thing got out of hand. the reason why i was talking about unicorns in the beginning of the show was i thought it would be odd and weird if a middle aged man would obsess with something a teenage girl would be, and i thought as a conservative, libertarian, it would be interesting to create like false narratives about you that would kind of throw off the left. if you assign certain kinds of behaviors to yourself, they don't know what to make of you. i learned this when i was at the huffington post, that i created this whole falls story behind me, that i lived with a flight instructor named scott. and he was never home. and there would always be some kind of weird stench in the basement, and i wrote this stuff because the left wasn't used to dealing with somebody who was messing with them. in the world of left and right, the right was always what i would call the dean wormer, from animal house. they delighted in that. my goal in lif
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2013 6:00pm EST
. >> guest: was i accused of being political? i was out of the country. i don't read that stuff. c-span: what happens when you hear them say, oh, he's the most political judge ever. >> guest: you know, times i talk to groups about judging judges. you can't judge napolitano:s unless -- you can't judge judges unless you know what they are working with. if you dislike a judge or -- unless you want your judges to ignore the text they are dealing with, and it's either a regulation or statute of the constitution. unless you want them to ignore the text, it's really unfair to judges to say i like the result; therefore, that's a good judge, or, i hate the result, therefore; that's a bad judge. you have to read the opinion. they are trying to reconcile, and then you say, i did a terrible job of interpreting his statute. that's an intelligent criticism, but not just because, you know, you don't like the way the opinion comes out. my opinions do not always come out the same way. i mean, they are not always, quote, conservative, to the contrary sometimes. in some respects, i ought to be the pinup of the
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 5:00pm EST
, no one would be able to say that they were okay without sharp reprisal. the fact that we don't say these things out loud and we don't see that out loud regularly is really the only reason that i can understand that they don't get taken care of covetousness, change, he falls, and that was my kind of participation in occupy, to find these things together, to find this a team together and find a way to make change together. i will then echo what was said prior to me that nothing went horribly wrong. nothing in diet, and that all of these types of movements take a long time. and if you are particularly patient and particularly grounded i think in activism then you take a 20 year view and a 100 year view and if you are really good you realize your lifetime doesn't matter particularly much and you think that is mere few. there are a number of people that first level often occupy that are willing to do that. >> thank you so much. let's hear your perspective. >> in terms of why occupied a rose i don't have much to add, but i think that something dramatic has happened in the last 15 years o
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2013 5:00pm EST
a foreclosure crisis like this. i don't think their is a lot of temptation for municipalities to do this absented foreclosure crisis. why would you do this unless you really have a problem with declining home values and the cycle of foreclosures and declining values and-equis hitting the more foreclosures. it's like someone in the emergency room saying, well, a cardiac arrest and that it not want to use a defibrillator because i thought and a few months it would come back and say, can you shot my chest again . there is really not an incentive to do it unless we have circumstances like the ones that we have got. >> a couple of the comments i was going to make. one less thing, we should look elsewhere. you could use that, loans that have an fha guarantee. those might be deemed federal property. so this sort of threat, if a community even shows to do so, and not even sure it would be illegal. so what i describe as the scare tactic, what about everybody else. >> the perspective, local communities to take federal property indicated perpetually illegal. the 100 percent agreed. private-lab
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 9:00am EST
that doesn't work and people don't like to work together. we tried an experiment and so far so good. hey say. >> host: why did it work for so long? >> guest: we think it worked because a similarity of work ethics. we both love to research and report. we love to research and report and we were of sound mind and it makes for a sound mind that is hard for all of us but it was similar work habits, we believed down deep in fairness, government, private interest, not always treat the average person fairly and we sort of realize that early on in the partnership and one way or another, writing about that ever since. >> host: donald bartlett was your first project for the philadelphia inquirer? >> federal housing administration, and it was a fascinating project that dragged on for two years. >> guest: they thought they were going to put together for three months and we wrote some articles after three months and these in turn generated tremendous response. poor people were being sold defective houses and the federal government was insuring them and they would collapse after a month or two at the same
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
in journalism. sometimes they don't like to work together, but we tried to experiment. so far so good, as they say. >> host: why did it work for so long? >> guest: we think it worked because a similarity of work ethics. we both love to research and report. in effect, we both say that means we are of sound mind. nighter it means we like to -- nighter one likes to ride because that also means we are sound mind. similar work habits. i think a belief down deep of fairness in government and some case private interests and not always treat the average person fairly, and we sort of realize that early on in the partnership one way or another we have been writing about that ever since. >> host: donald barlett, the remember what your first project for the philadelphia enquirer was in 1971? >> guest: oh, yes. federal housing administration, fha. it was the fascinating project because it dragged on for two years. >> guest: they thought there were going to put this together for about three months, and we wrote some articles after three months, and it generated a tremendous response. what happened
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:15pm EST
as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers that we don't even see or know about. and relating to a transformation in advertising that almost anyone except people in the advertising industry doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: in the last 20 years, advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and then the internet. originally, advertising was making an ad, a commercial and then putting on just a few very popular media; newspapers, radio, magazines. with the rise of cable, all of a sudden you had hundreds of channels, and then with the internet it's infinite. but more so you have tingal stuff, and it -- digital stuff, and it becomes interactive. part of of what we know about is that we can talk back to the advertiser, we can click on manager, there's a -- something, there's a whole lot of stuff going on under the hood where data are taken from us, are used, and we become creatures that are created by the advertisers to understand us and then change what we see on the web very often -- this is going to happen more and more as we move forward
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 1:00am EST
was absolutely right saying this chapter here, i don't think anyone's going to understand it, and he also made wonderful suggestions, and so we took a chapter out and put it in after wards, what it was like to get out of diplomatic service and go to rutgers university where i've been ever since as a professor, and in the very late 60s, early 70s, i went there in 69, and i'm still there, and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a culture, and i thought it was a stupid idea, and i had three little children i was not going to abandon that i i thought was not a good war. there's two stories i want to focus on this evening. one is about the day i spent alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places, and the other one is about one of the really terrible events of the cold war which is when the united states ended up dropping four hydrogen bombs on spain. luckily, unarmed, and not on purpose, and i'll tell you that story later. two very different stories. the king's story is a soft story, and the bomb story is a hard story. before i do that, i thought i'd tell you about a few of the other chapte
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 1:30pm EST
, what they think they know because someone told them what they don't know what all. the other difficulty about writing about the recent past is that it's not always easy to establish the past. the past that is so close to us. and yet, this is. to take apart, or commonsense view of the recent past and to interrogate what we think we know. to demystify a comedy mythologize, to move beyond the clichÉ about winners and losers and saints and sinners and the wisdom and encourage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians. grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of anti-fun house mirror. which, if i looked at it long enough, would reflect back to me often a hazy and indistinct, distorted forms, images of the things and people and places which organized and arranged and told the story of 20th century america. i was a colleague of arthur's lessons are in the city of new york. i had used a treasure trove of material is that jean kennedy smith's daughter, who is writing letters from her father to her aunt and uncles, and i
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 3:00pm EST
with two veterans, benjamin, who serve in the marines, and brian in the air force. i don't belong on a panel with people who actually lived through it, although my book is about war as well. last through, there are other veterans in my book are actually here. stan and dave roller are in the back there, and thank you for being here. means a lot to me that you're here. [applause] >> one of the things i'm asked is why did i write a book about this one combat outpost in afghanistan? it's not really my area of expertise. i'm a political reporter, the senior white house correspondent for abc news. the answer is i feel like i at any time pick combat outpost quieting to write about. i felt like come about outpost keeting picked me. on october 3, 2009, i was in the recovery room of the hospital with my dear wife, jennifer, and i was holding our day-old son jack, and everything was fine. she had a baby so that's why we were there. and out of the corner of my eye on the television, i heard a story that was just harrowing from this remote outpost, that i'd never heard of, at the bottom of thr
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 8:00pm EST
was no underwriting. this lender by the way saddled with the new york attorney general's office because i don't know of you guys remember, it was called the preferred lender list where you know lenders were in some cases accused of paying b-schools for preferential treatment and for them to steer students toward a particular loan products. that was the case with this lender. when you think about, you can sort of understand some of the anger and how a generation may rightly feel very duped in some ways and stock with very little relief at this point now that they are so far in debt. >> now a look at the tenure and legacy of house speaker john boehner. we will show you as much of the "washington journal" segment as we can until the richard nixon 100 birthday gala in about half an hour. >> host: on wednesday here in the "washington journal" in our last hour taking look at a recent magazine piece. we are joined by robert costa at national review to talk about a couple of pieces you have written. we will start with the most recent. "boehner the survivor" is what you wrote on january 4, 2014. 13, excuse m
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 7:00am EST
cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the stories of guantanamo and the business in afghanistan, maybe stories none of us have ever heard. he will be an embarrassment to the government if he is ever released. he is part of this situation where we reach
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 5:15pm EST
the book pretty readily. with publishers producing fewer books every year now, if they don't patronize stores like this or independent stores, they're going to find that there aren't going to be books around. there is already a decrease in the number of books that are available because of the-books, textbooks being put on line instead of being produced. so there will definitely be a decrease in the number of books available. if stores like this still survive there won't be books readily available for the public. as the book business continues to change, i would like to just be able to persevere and stay here for the indefinite future. >> for more information on book tv recent visit to providence, rhineland, and the miniature cities visited by our local content vehicles could to c-span.org / local content. >> next on book tv, henry gallagher recalls his assignment as officer in charge of the security detail for james maraniss, the first african-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september 1962. this is about 60 meant -- 40 minutes. >> thank you, ralph, john. my gratit
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 11:15am EST
would not have had a green job. if they installed regulatory, they don't have green jobs. if the install low flow toilet, they have green jobs. farmers, if they grow corn for ethanol, they have a green job. if they grow corn for ethanol and corn for people to eat, they have a green job. if they just grow corn for people to eat, even though they are farms, they don't have green jobs. salvation army workers, if they recycle used clothing, then they have green jobs, too. well, there are 4665 people who produce renewable energy and utility companies, according to the bureau of labor statistics. they just report which came out in april. they are clearly green but you have to ask, are they making energy more expensive or are they making it less expensive. well, it's clear that they're making energy more expensive. the average level has cost entering service in 2017 according to the department of energy is it there till by natural gas which cost $66 per megawatt hour, for wind, $96 per megawatt hour, for solar power, $153 per megawatt hour. well, five years ago in 07 when the energy loan guaran
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 10:00pm EST
is necessary and imperative to sway the doubtful. if you don't dot numbers you won't succeed. the two men together succeeded. >> we're speaking with forking and the comprise of the union. thank you. .. >> host: we are here today to talk about your book, "that's not what they meant" reclaiming the founding fathers from america's right wing. how has america's right-wing claimed the founding fathers? >> guest: well i think the founding fathers are part of the wilderness in america and we all claim them for a lot of different political points. i think that in the current historical moment, the right-wing has done two things that i find a little bit disturbing. one is they have collected fight the founding fathers and created a sort of collective single entity, a high mind founding father and they have attributed a whole lot of things that one or two people during the founding generation believed to this collective mind. then they have used it to try to say this is what our founders believed. certain opinions are illegitimate and cannot be entertained. and have used that founding -- and i thin
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:35pm EST
in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democratic party. during the war opposition arose, and some were profoundly opposed to the davis administration, on ver
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 5:00pm EST
talked to people, don't just take pictures of empty buildings with nobody in the picture. >> that's one of the things that struck me about the book. it's not to treat the building. is to treat the. in some cases it's the people you happen to cross. it's not talking heads, not public officials, not price people. vicious people you met. one of my favorite stories in the book is the day you go down to the site of the original train from which now has a hotel on it that is sitting there empty and you met a bunch of different people down there, but one of them was this guy, tony. i wanted you to talk about how you met him hemline included him in the boat. >> at least asserted a telling moment. i guess i loved that kind of moment because of the serendipity of it. i'd been reading a lot of detroit history. it wasn't long after i got here. you know, as people here know, near the plaza is where cadillac, the french explorer, land owners a statue and so i've been reading about that and decided in this an unusually sunny day in the fall, so i decided to make my way down there and sit outside. it w
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 5:00pm EST
, and if so, what has been the effect on -- [inaudible] >> um, i don't think it's add any significant effect on the -- we're doing well on time. we received 15,000 applications in the last year, 85% were completed in ten working days, and 99.8% within 60 working days in the foreign office. .. and number of questions we want to ask you in relation to these. >> next policy review on this organization would seem disappointed they haven't been involved in the review and also some of the industry her haven't been involved. do you have a particular view on that? with that officials how we do that and as explained to the committee i think in this year in 2012 we have had the protection of that decided including by the way the specific department. >> we have done the things we said we were going to do in the organization. there are new requirements to report from their concerns and i hope they include more information to this. >> they have an objective here in the proposal but we have made >> i would like to start with a couple questions. you keep saying the communities of history -- the so-called c
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 6:00pm EST
running the wire during that entire five seasons, it could come from that, i don't know if there is a symbolic meaning there. c-span: what was your part? smack i played a detective, the character tina greg. she is known to be a cop. but i see her as much more than that. she was the moral compass the police department. c-span: we have a small clip of the trailer. let's play it and get a feeling. >> are you saying you don't trust me? matt you are looking at a tv station. >> here we go. >> bring it. [cheers] >> okay, okay. >> look at her. she runs a dam art gallery. savanna what was that? c-span: what was last seen? >> guest: that is where tina greg talks about what moves her to become a cop and her connection to the field. the clip of the women they see in the showplace microfine. she was also an attorney and did not like the fact that tina greg was in law enforcement. she wanted me to get out of there. c-span: were you very connected? >> guest: yes, she was very connected to the job and more connected than she would have realized. c-span: it was situated in baltimore? >>
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 7:00pm EST
films. c-span: one question about teach for america. how big of an ego destroyer is that when they don't take you? how many young people try to become teach for america? >> guest: i couldn't believe it. i thought, i'm trying to help people and be a teacher and you get it, but it hurt. i wouldn't be sitting here if that hadn't happened. i ended up interviewing wendy kopp from teach for america for my first son, so it came full circle. c-span: go back to the project of going around the country. where did you go, how many people really do how much did it cost you? >> guest: in fall 2005 a data for three of of my best friends. it was really cheap. we were scrapping together money from family and friends. we get sponsorship money from nantucket nectar's and penske corp., but he was really bootstraps, rest guerrilla filmmaking. i'd never held a camera before, never taken a civil class before. it is just learning as we went. it is really an exhilarating experience. what an honor to go up to anyone across the country and get their story and speaks them about truth sendups of their lives. it wa
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 12:00pm EST
in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians" to be out in early 2013. this brings me tore most recent book, the one we are here to discuss with her. i have many questions to ask her, but before doing so, let me say a few general things
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 12:00am EST
are very. were not going to talk about that. don't worry. i was forced to make and a couple of questions raised about "witness" and one might say more generally anti-communism are relevant today. the first place where subfor clearly gets development when we deal with the great communist power communist power of the day, china. chambers -- this is a passage i like. chambers wrote, what i had been felt for me like 30 rags. the rags wrecks itself for me where not a there communism but a new web in the mine, loomis shroud which has part of the spirit of man paralyzing the name of rationalism, the instinct of his soul. denying him the name of knowledge the reality of his soul and his birthright in that mystery on which new knowledge falters and shatters at every step. we now watch the soulless chinese communist party battle chinese christians, chinese buddhists, and believe that they can only offer a few more better factory jobs in port cities that will provide the answer to the chinese people's freedom. everything in that sense that chambers wrote about communism and its failures is quite ad
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
, but by almost any measurement, somewhere between three and eight million more will lose their homes if woe don't do something. so, i'd argue, it's not in the rearview mirror. in fact it's in front of us. who bears the cost or what's the consequence? there's lots of consequences, obviously. first and foremost, families who are disrupted and taken from their homes. and it's worth thinking about the numbers. we're talking tree or four our five million more families. that's as many as 20 million more americans. why it's a problem? mike alluded to. when you're underwater, your behavior changes. you don't spend as much money oning in. the only thing you consume more of is healthcare because are in the stress, look at the numbers, that goes up. so the costs are significant, both the families, and i'd argue to society, and obviously the communities in which these people live. foreclosures cost both hard dollars and soft dollars. there are property tax issues, and the consequences felt by all of us. >> mr. miller, do you have anything to add to that? in particular, road blocks to solutions. >> i don't
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 2:30pm EST
of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from that, you need to label them followers of the devil, satan. they look for the devil, and looked among the deities, and complex religion, very elaborate, well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found issue. now, whose issue? i refer to this as the imminent imminent -- an issue to teach humanity that there's always more than one side to any issue, more than one face to any appearance, the best plans advi
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 6:00pm EST
. in this case, i had to go to a publisher, random house, and tell them, "well, look, i don't have chapter one yet and i don't have an outline for you. i can't tell you who the characters will be yet. i can't tell you what the story will be, but you just give me all this money and i'll see you in four or five years. don't worry. it'll be great." so once you sell a book like that, after that convincing them about the length is just a walk in the park. c-span: this book costs $28 to buy if you don't buy it in a discount store. >> guest: that's right, although it is being discounted, a practice of which i approve. c-span: is it true that you got a half million dollar advance? >> guest: i can't contractually tell you exactly what the advance is, but you're not far wrong. c-span: i read that you'd spent it all, too, over that six years. >> guest: oh, yes. well, you know how it is. if you're following candidates in a campaign, you get on their plane, and what they're generally doing is they're dividing the cost of that charter flight by the number of reporters they're carrying aboard. in effect, the
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 8:00am EST
, but you realize thatyou don't -- this is your time to pin the regime and colonel gadhafi to the wall. if you don't expresses what you want from this and have a clear end goal, things will not work out well. and we're willing to say that even if we are poised to make a lot of money out of this. this wasn't the view of everyone, of course, but these kinds of hushed sort of warnings resonated very strongly with me. and i think are in some ways explained or increasingly explained by some of the news that we're hearing in retrospect about what actually went on during some period of the gadhafi regime. so, you know, the book, i think there were basically four takeaways, four main points that i try to make, and one of them is very, sort of has been brought into profile by the presidential debate and the whole issue of what happened in benghazi on september 11th which is the, what i call the myth of libya's irrelevance to u.s. policy. and i think over the course of, if you go back to the foundations of the libyan state in 1951, you know, u.s. relations with libya have been, you know, u.s. ha
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2013 12:00pm EST
if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complementary nature between the commercial programs and the conservation program i felt was one of its strengths. the lack of a clear rationale for human exploration beyond the international space station is another serious problem. the administration's approach of being capability driven while it has a certain logic to it also has a lot of vulnerability. and historically i think a more strictly geopolitical approach such as i've talked about the close cold war approach for leading the international cooperation what in fact be a better approach for the united states. there are others that one could take that simply talking about the capabilities absent a strategic rationale that's integrated with other international u.s. interests i think is a very flout path as we are seeing today. >> thank you my time is expired. >> the gentleman from minnesota michigan, mr. clark. >> thank you mr. chair to get funding for nasa is important but especial
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 5:00pm EST
going to have to see. we don't control all those details. we cannot mandate that a lender lend to any particular consumer. we can just set up the right framework so we can rule out the reckless abuses like before the crisis. we think that having done so we are going open space for the credit union lenders we talked about. some of the programs we're talking about the non-profit groups and others and the main lending community to be more confident about their ability to lend to homeowners and the market will support that and they won't have to compete against some. bottom of the barrel, abusive, misleading types of loans they were competing against. we're going have to see how the market evolves from here. >> thank you. >> brian cue kusack? terri hunt? good afternoon, my name is i'm the vice president of the national association of federal credit unions. i have hope we have credit union members here today? excellent. as you know, credit unions are charged with providing credit to this country. it's something that congress has specifically told us we need to do. i think that is a shared
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 12:00pm EST
,some -- somewhere between 3 and 8 million more will lose their homes if we don't do something. it's not in the rearview mirror, in fact, it's out in front of us. there's lots of con we think sos, obviously. first and foremost, it's the families themselves who are disrupted and taken from their homes, and it's worth just thinking about these numbers for a second. i mean, we're talking about three or four or five million more families, that's as many as 20 million more americans. why it's a problem, mike also alluded to, when you're underwater, your behavior changes. you don't spend as much money on anything. the only thing you consume more of, by the way, is health care. because under the stress, you find when you look at those numbers, that's the thing that goes up. so the costs are significant both to the family, but i'd argue to society and, obviously, to the communities in which these people live. foreclosures cost both hard dollars and soft dollars. there are property tax issues, so i say the consequences are felt by all of us. >> mr. miller, do you have anything to add to tha
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 12:00pm EST
you can locate people. you don't talk about a settlement really at the moon, but more and more people that i know that are aware of the economics, aware of history and what this country needs will agree with me that if you go to mars, you go there for permanency. if you go once and come back, go twice and come back i can tell you the senate will find out some other way to spend that money and we will have wasted everything we did. it's a government, conagra's that works on short term objectives to help keep their constituents satisfied by bringing home the bacon to get elected. [inaudible] [laughter] >> from the lead to president kennedy played a role in developing nasa and the space program. where were you when you heard the news and what was your impression of his leadership? >> i was at mit, and i thought there's a very positive statement. after i knew what the mercury program had been set as objectives. in april of 611th, what could we do? may 5th ellen shepherd went up and down. several like richard branson's project. it wasn't a flight. 20 days later, the president said we shoul
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 11:00am EST
were fanatics. you don't hear about the russian side of an you don't hear about the other choices that could be had. >> this book stirred up a controversy and expected it to. i wonder if we get into some of the areas coming in, historians like to argue about and that have already elicited commentary on different sites. the cold war, is what you're writing about here, and to the film. and perhaps as i alluded you argue so much is the trend is primarily to blame for the beginning of the cold war, that stalin and the soviets would've been, would've been opened and were welcoming the wartime alliance between the two countries. but it was american action primarily with some allies, british, for example. is that an accurate -- >> i would say that is accurate. we certainly don't consider stalin is blameless in all of us. we certainly don't downplay stalin's brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. that's important a factor in. if we look at the broad sweep of the history, beginning in 1917, 1918 when the tray first sent tr
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 8:00am EST
to enact a law for net neutrality is a possibility, but i don't see the house republicans going for it. so that would put it all back up in the air, and we'd be back to square one on net neutrality. >> host: so do you see that coming to congress at some point, or do you see the court actually making a decision? >> guest: well, the court is going to make a decision, and tacked come early this year. and if they uphold the rules, they're going to be safe, and that's going to be the standard now. if they strike them down, then it'll be whether congress is going to try to act to give the fcc explicit authority in this area. as long as the republicans control the house, i don't see that happening. but the other issue is that if the court does strike down the rule, it's even broader than just those regulations in particular because it puts the fcc's power to regulate the internet into question. and that's really the core of the issue here. so not just net neutrality, but any action on the data caps or other similar issues. it's whether the fcc has the power to regulate the main communication serv
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 7:00pm EST
williamsburg. i guess in seeing that picture in your description, i started thinking, i don't know if every scene inside this place. i've been writing since the mid-1990s. so i am not a friend of fannie mae. but i've never been inside. some reporters have been inside and there was "washington post" reporter that during mr. johnson's era was allowed to follow him around and did a very in-depth story story on it. but the building itself since telegraph said they message of power and royalty on most and fannie mae with that of course the taxpayers had to go to disney. >> and the most basic of terms, what does fannie mae do? have commander stan but they do? >> guest: fannie mae is not a mortgage lender. but fannie mae buys mortgage loans that have been created by banks or other institutions. they sometimes hold them on its own balance sheet and reaps the income the homeowner pays or in other cases an ice package of both loans and guarantees them and sells them to investors. so the enterprise essentially all insert guarantees home mortgages and it was set up in the aftermath of the great depress
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 1:25pm EST
justice system, think the system makes sense. it's cheap, it deals with staggering caseloads. but they don't understand why it is that the nonlawyers are frustrated. it seem like justice has been bought and sold and modified -- comodified. so you get voters clamoring for tougher laws and lawyers bargaining these provisions away so that some people get special deals and other people who are just stubborn enough to vote at trial wind up getting heavier punishments. and the voters react because it seems like it's hidden, and it's low visibility, and it depends on your connections or your lawyer rather than on what you did. and the frustrating thing here, of course, is we have a democracy, and the system should be run for what the people think it's about which is blaming and punishing. but instead we have a system where people don't even understand what's going on in this their own system. we can't go back to an era where every case was tried by a jury. our system is too clogged, trials take far too long today. over the past half century, we have made them too complicated. but what we can do i
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
about understanding the flaws in our criminal justice system in a way that i don't think had ever been, you know, very real to folks. and that was a critically important piece or contribution, i this i, of -- i think, of the cases. ultimately, kind of fast forward, governor rick perry pardoned my clients and exonerated them, but the reality is that that several of my clients left prison suffering from severe depression upon their release and developed very significant, um, issues after having been imprisoned wrongfully for four years. i remember calling and desperately trying to find a drug treatment for four of my clients who were living in their cars without any place, they couldn't get jobs because everyone, despite the exonerations, were still convinced they were guilty. and i remember calling around to the only drug treatment center for indigent folks, for poor folks in west texas and being told that probably i should get them reincarcerated because there in prison they were actually able to get treatment. and the absurdity of that was apparent to me. it was harder to find a treat
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 8:00pm EST
is the right step to take, but we also need to take a look at how we got guantÁnamo together. i don't know the bigger fiscal waste in guantÁnamo. as peter mentioned, 166 detainees were at guantÁnamo. almost $850,000 per person per year. maximum security confinement in a federal prison had to be about 30,000 dollars. we are spending 27 or 28 more times to keep people in guantÁnamo bay. if you consider the 166 people, the cia has concluded that we don't have this and they don't present a significant risk and we don't want to keep them. but it is because of their citizenship. you know, they give its consent to kill people, but they are not trustworthy when it comes to detainees. so there are things that are very critical in our view of yemen. i think that guantÁnamo remains part of this information. congress passed a bill that refused human rights violations and president obama sign it. in retaliation, the russians signed a bill that prevents american families from adopting russian children. vladimir putin was quite angry about this bill that was passed regarding guantÁnamo. so we wasted
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 8:00pm EST
the sec back to square one, whether it's a push in congress to enact a law, a possibility that i don't see the house republicans going for. >> host: tuesday the court making a decision and having neutrality on the. >> guest: if they uphold the rule, then they will be safe and i will be the standard now. whether the sec has the power regulate the services of the 21st century. >> host: another guess that we have today is eliza krigman. >> guest: thank you for having me on the show. i would agree with brendan sasso. when you look at regulating the internet, which is of course the most important platform and and communications right now, i think the conventional wisdom is that the court is likely to strike down supporters of the rules aren't comfortable with the fact that the commission does not use the authority under the communications act. another thing to consider about this issue is will google provide the same rule as corporate rabbis, if you will, to guide this issue forward. he was the top issue for them. >> host: there was talk of rewriting the telecom act of the 1990s. what do you th
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
.. i don't want to begin neglecting to mention a few things. one, as you really want to thank cowles for continuing to be piles. but to restart what they used to be. if you're not bill clinton or naomi wolf or whatever, it is to be various bookstores like this all over the country and now my book to raise town hall in seattle, towels books to your here, politics & prose in d.c., when in new york, one in boston. frankly i'm not trying to go to more bookstores because it's hard work to travel over the place. now i have two kids and everything changed. it is that, got friends in san francisco who want to see me. another some good hucksters in san francisco. what you have here is very special. i want to acknowledge a couple groups if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, the group to talk to first base enu cascadia for new urbanism and i'm sure you can find them online, but they're concerned about the issues of the talking about tonight and descriptive for 20 years has in pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad h
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 8:30pm EST
problem and if you don't have an immediate transplant, you're going to die. but the good news is i have three donors, you can choose any one of them. one of them is a former olympic athlete and prior to her demise, she was practicing every day for the olympics. another one was a former triathlon athlete and he was swimming and running everyday. the third one is an 80-year-old comptroller. which one would you like? and he thought for a moment and said i will take the comptroller. they prepared for the surgery and should the man's wife said why would you she was a heart transplant donor of an 80-year-old? and he said, his heart has never been used. [laughter] [laughter] so how do we maintain national security? especially in leaner budget times. the defense budget -- but we have seen some real declines and there may be more coming. so what do we need to do to accommodate leaner times? well, i will offer three starts as a strategy as to how we go about maintaining national security that is the person more important thing. the second thing is we have to make more disciplined use of the money
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 7:00pm EST
talk so dramatically and in such a negative fashion about the adults who fill our prisons, and we don't realize that every one of those adults was a child who we could have done more for, to prevent a lot of the challenges they face as an adult, and i think douglass said at it easier to raise strong children than to heal broken men. so i just feel a real urgency in america that we do not prioritize our children as much as we should. >> tina, he favorite part of the book is your forward. which is lovely because we work for two and a half years on the book, but at it so move bag it's so from the heart, and this week you're doing michigan else from the heart. you're engaged in the snap challenge. maybe you can talk about the snap challenge and why you're doing this. >> well, my staff teases me. i was up late with my girlfriend, twitter, and -- [laughter] >> when is the mayor going to get a life. but i was going back and forth, and for those of you who use social media, people just roll out things that are dumb, frankly, and -- but just as i was getting into an intellectual question about
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 8:30am EST
-- you certainly don't want to leave things worse than you found them. and this is, of course, much of the consternation and the stress, i suspect, of people in afghanistan feeling post-2014. what is going to be left behind? will the peace and stability hold? what about the ongoing development projects that are in that country? and that has been true going back to second world war and beyond. so put it into the context of syria. who can make the most meaningful contributions now? and the contribution doesn't have to be military. russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council and exert influence. they, i suggest, are the most influential at this time. and have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop by its acquiescence standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world wrings its hands and sucks its teeth. >> how do we accomplish that? >> well, pause i think they can -- because i think they can exert influence in the capital of syria. i think they'r
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 9:00am EST
. the issues we've been working on with esther and don at the department of energy. the recent ihs study projected with prodevelopment policy 166,000 new jobs created just in our upextreme sector by 2020 could be held by minority workers and more than 285,000 new jobs by 30. 2030. for our industry and for the millions of americans who were still looking for work. with up to half of our oil and gas industries technical personnel turning over over the next seven to ten years, our industry provides an important opportunity to address the challenge of high unemployment. but a key part of that solution, as we all well know, is government policy. that enabled the m3 of domestic energy production to continue on. and maintains a strong domestic refining sector rather than discuss couraging it. -- discouraging it. u.s. oil and natural gas companies are providing more than jobs and democratic drove in areas we often overlook or don't think about. for example the success of the industry means enhancing our energy security, our economic security, and national security. millions of americans gain ret
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 7:30pm EST
they don't want any troops but in my discussion they don't think about it which is what we face today is a question of state formation. and in 2004. what i mean by that is and attempting to build the afghan state what happened was on the one hand they put money into kabul but at the same time we had independent and unilateral agreements in the periphery. with the private militia that were funded and supported. stood to create the afghan police we also gave the government of canada our to maintain his private militia the does not answer to the afghan government. and you can create a state with the basic definition the there is a series that to give an example may be 200 scattered around the country to have afghan and militiamen these are irregular militiamen with private security contractors we require those that need to be protected from the insurgent attacks to be paid directly or indirectly through the subcontracting machines the six year 70,000 young men those who do not fall under the afghan government purview whatsoever in all zero of their existence entirely so what happens when
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 7:00pm EST
citycamorra service to to depression, mound of work? so you can't blame them really, although we don't agree it is the gateway to the west. we think of st. louis is the exit from the east. [laughter] there's some similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign language in our poetry. he tends to use sanskrit. i don't use much sanskrit. i don't actually know much sanskrit. as one of those kids who got a got a new to during sanskrit class in kansas city, sort of look out the window. [laughter] i use yiddish sound. i think it's fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest palm using skittish. they shortest palm is called something like the societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. title does that count in the links. and the poem once jack, oy vey. fastmac and also in yugoslavia started to break up, i did a palm that had croatians are the good guys now, although their past is somewhat shady, so worry not that these same guys chased both your would be in your cd. [laughter] with both use a little german. when george w. bush app
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
to a more non-robust military mission, it may require it -- i don't know, but i think we need a new legal framework for the post-9/11 world. and i think we have pieces of policies that are cobbled together. the patriot act, which is highly controversial. it all just sort of works. but there are serious issues about interrogation policies. and as i have said, i have strongly spoken to john mccain about that. and there are also other issues on how we do these intelligence missions. we have rogue actors who tried it attack borders, we have many different kinds of challenges. i think many will want to look at this. this includes a member of the cia external board. i would personally want to contribute to that legislation and we will want to work closer. >> okay, the first phone call we have is from bob from chicago. >> caller: hello, you just touched on 2009 end it was quite controversial at that time. there was supported rendition like drones and so forth that were part of the administration program that the democrats criticized at that time. obama has now institutionalized those programs. i
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 8:15am EST
designed to play a secondary role to nations whose sovereignty we saw as inviolable. and, you know, i don't think that's sustainable because so many of the interests you or i have as individual citizens of wherever we.com from are really affected by decisions that happen on the global stage. >> host: dade rothkopf is our guest. the numbers are up on the screen if you'd like to participate. 202 is the area code, 585-3885 in the east and central time zones, 585-3886 if you live in the mountain and pacific time zones. mr. rothkopf, former managing editor -- managing director of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: well, it's -- the fp group is a division of washington post that publishes foreign policy magazine. the foreign policy web site which is now much bigger than the magazine, we have almost three-and-a-half million visitor a month to the web site and run a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter, a chapter about a swedish goat. what is that story? >> gue
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2013 8:00pm EST
, just so you don't think were picking on dod, a.i.d. is no better. as far as we can tell, they have a hard time grasping what they constructed and even where they are located. and i would ask you to go to our web site in the next month or two and you are going to see an interesting audit and the findings i believe are going to be, we are missing a number of buildings that we thought we had dealt in afghanistan. i don't know where they went, but they be they were never built. the second issue that we are facing has to do with quality assurance. it is our job at sigar to conduct oversight of the reconstruction effort, but it is also the responsibility of the agencies, the implementing agencies, to monitor the progress and to do the due diligence before you turn them over to the afghans -- government. we are unfortunately finding that agencies often, often fail to fully implement their quality assurance programs. let's go back to the kunduz garrison. we found that quality assurance process was virtually nonexistent during the first nine months of the project. the most critical nine-m
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